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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
obama repeated his pledge he's open to new ideas, but is holding firm on his call for higher taxes on top income earners, something missing from the g.o.p. plan. with just three weeks left, the two sides are still at odds with their opening offers. th time ticking away to reach a deal before tax cuts expire and spending cuts hit, president obama today said he's still optimistic a deal will be done and he's willing to compromise, but negotiations just aren't there yet. >> it's going to require what i talked about in the campaign, which is a balanced, responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure the country grows. >> tom: the president rejected the proposal republicans presented him yesterday. it would cut the debt by $2.2 trillion over ten years, but would not raise taxes on america's highest earners, the biggest sticking point. the two sides seem to be allowing themselves room to bargain. the president said today he'd be open to lowering tax rates for high earners later next year as part of a broad tax reform package. and senate re
to entitlement spending, and no new taxes on the wealthy. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. auto sales speed up in november, with buyers taking advantage of ultra-cheap financing to ditch their old cars. >> susie: ford takes the wraps off a new lincoln, taking the brand back to its heritage, but will a re-branding help rev-up sales, we ask ford c.e.o. alan mulally. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! after a weekend of trading accusations over the lack of progress on avoiding the fiscal cliff, both sides now have put their opening offers on the table. last week, it was treasury secretary timothy geithner meeting with top republicans. this afternoon, house speaker john boehner sketched out the g.o.p. proposal in a letter to the white house, and the proposal borrows suggestions from the president's own debt reduction commission, whose plan was ignored last year. the republican letter offered $900 billion in spending cuts from program reforms to medicare and social security. the g.o.p. plan would raise $800 billion in revenues by closing loop-holes and reforming the tax code, but stops short of specifi
would raise $800 billion in revenues by closing loop-holes and reforming the tax code, but stops short of specifics. noticeably missing: the higher taxes on high-wage earners which president obama has insisted on. the white house responded, saying "the g.o.p. proposal does not meet the test of balance. in fact, it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bill." it's not just the federal government under pressure. credit ratings agency fitch calls the fiscal cliff the biggest concern for state credit in 2013. saying, "any meaningful federal deficit reduction is likely to lower state funding, forcing program elimination or backfilling." as the tax hikes and spending cuts approach, u.s. manufacturers saw business shrink last month. the institute of supply management's purchasing managers index fell unexpectedly to 49.5, down from 51.7 in october. a reading below 50 means business has fallen back into contraction. the november statistic is the lowest since july 2009. the dow fell 60, the nasdaq down eight, the s&p 500 lost six. >> susie: jeff sa
cliff related selling as shareholders worries that capital gains tax rates will be higher next year. >> still, financial planner sharon appleman says selling stock solely for tax reasons isn't the best idea. >> i definitely think it's a legitimate concern and can be an opportunity. and i would say if somebody was interested in reducing a physician any-- position anyway, that can certainly be a great time to do it, you know, why pay higher taxes in a few months time when you can pay a lower tax now. >> reporter: and some analysts say, before unloading the shares, consider that fundamentals for apple haven't really changed. sure, revenue growth may slow and margins may contract, and there are worries the tech giant will have trouble fending off competition from increasingly popular android products. but, to some analysts, the shares look especially cheap today, especially considering their move south since the september high. >> we think the smart phone trend is still in the early to middle innings and is not in the late innings yet. so we think, to the extent that apple can maintain
to be weak due to worries about the fiscal cliff. with $600 billion in automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts set to start next yer, why aren't more firms postponing hiring decisions? >> what we're hearing from businesses is that it is really hard to actually pull back hiring right now, because they've already fired so many workers, gotten so lean that it's really difficult. >> reporter: but not all the surprises in the report were good. at 7.7%, the unemployment rate hit its lowest level since december 2008. but that was mostly due to people giving up their search for work. and there's another disappointing trend, weak wage growth. >> what we are not seeing is strong income generation. the slowing in wage gains-- the weak bargaining power of labor comes across in this report and >> reporter: so although the labor market is not getting worse, it's not getting a lot better, either. and there are plenty of risks that could cause businesses to cancel projects, and hiring plans. >> clearly one of the biggest risks is that we don't see a deal on the fiscal cliff, or that they drag it
're thinking with increased taxes, because of the fiscal cliff, if the worst happens, consumer demand is just going to fall off. they are already ting action today to try to prepare for that eventuality. but the consumer is kind of blankly ignoring this, and confidence is up for really lots of reasons. i mean, the net worth of households has been repaired. about two-thirds of it has come back as house prices rise and stock prices are now double what they were at the bottom in march of '09. when you look at state and local budgets, they're now much better with revenue rising. so theayof and budget cuts, we think are waning, if not over. housing is clearly coming back. things are improving and consumer confidence reflects that. >> tom: but there is that dark cloud of the fiscal cliff. you mentioned it earlier, businesses planning for consumer confidence to go off that cliff if we go off it as a country. do you not agree with that prospect? >> well, no. i believe it will -- if nothing happens and there is no agreement, i think there will be a mild, kind of technical recession in the first half o
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)